Chaos of a Sandur

Sandur – the plain at the foot of a glacier built from sediments interwoven with thousands of meltwater river branches. Endless forms and variations. One of my favorite (if not the favorite) feature of the Icelandic landscape.

We arrived at this place in the middle of a great sunset, and first had a color image in my mind. But ended up with black and white as it conveys a cleaner message this way. This is an occasion when color distracts and confuses.

Chaos of a Sandur

Chaos of a Sandur

Taken with the Canon 5DS R and Zeiss Otus 1.4/55. The wind was strong, so I used ISO 400 to shorten shutter speed as much as possible, weighed the tripod down and used my body as a wind breaker in front of the camera and tripod.

Living in a Cave

Cave-dwelling bacteria decorate the walls of lava tubes in the Snæfellsnes peninsula.

Living in a Cave

Living in a Cave

Since we went there with a regular tour, there was no possibility to bring a tripod and set up shots as I normally would. So the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II together with the great little Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM lens, a 600EX flash (was not used for the shot above) and the mighty Nitecore SRT7 flashlight came with me.

The flashlight was used to light this shot. The 35mm is a very sharp lens, and you can handhold it at ridiculously slow shutter speeds. Plus the 1D X II is very good at high ISOs, so they made the perfect combination for this adventure.

Layers

It’s eye-opening to experience how my relation to Iceland evolves over time. I’m here for the fifth time, now spending the entire summer in the country, but haven’t seen the island for a decade. And it has changed a lot. And I also changed a lot.

It was hard to forget the Iceland I had in my fond memories and let myself see what’s in front of me. But once I began to free myself from the past, image making started to get rewarding again.

And the island is still capable of delivering great scenery, just in slightly different ways. Just like the one below.

Layers

Layers

This image was captured at a nice geothermal area – well, it was much better ten years ago, before an explosion wiped most of the features. But this time we went there chasing the reddish glow on the horizon, not the geothermal stuff.

Taken with the Canon 5DS R and Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 2/135.

Dark Mountains

It’s not over until it’s over – this is a golden truth in photography. We were driving the whole afternoon for nothing. It rained, and the waterfall at our original destination wasn’t in its top shape. But on the way home we literally ran into this majestic scene. Took roughly 50 frames, exploring different compositions, and couldn’t be happier with the results.

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Dark Mountains

Captured with the Canon 5DS R with the Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 2/135 lens. Yes, one must bring a telephoto to Iceland.