Sea of Branches

This is the first real image made with my digital view camera setup. Just went out to get familiar with the camera, do image quality evaluations and some stitching tests. But during one of those stitching tests the left side of a tree captured my imagination.

Sea of Branches

Shot with the Cambo Actus-G, Rodenstock HR Digaron-S 100mm f/4 and Canon EOS 5DS R. A little front tilt, 15mm back fall and a few millimeters of shift to the left was used. The elegance of movements still blow my mind. Focusing was done in Kuuvik Capture.

A few words about the aforementioned stitching test. If you ever dreamed about extremely high resolution images that are pin sharp from corner to corner, this rig can easily deliver wonderful 100+ megapixel files.

Flaming Fall Forest

Tilt-shift lenses help you to use perspectives impossible to obtain with normal ones.

The maximum 12mm shift on my Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II lens helped me to tame the strongly converging trees resulting from an upward pointed lens – but still keep some from the convergence, which makes this image work for me.

Flaming Fall Forest

Flaming Fall Forest

Colors from the Canon 5DS R and Capture One Pro 8 combination are just lovely (unfortunately you won’t see their full glory on an sRGB web image).

On the downside of things, the camera clearly outresolves the lens – which is a pity, as this is the best wide angle tilt-shift option currently available. Once the 24 TS was my very best lens, but today with the 5DS R all my Zeiss, Sigma and most Canon optics are better.

But regardless of the resolution difference, there are situations when the perspective control capability is a must, and in these cases the 24 TS comes out of the bag.

Shot tethered to a MacBook Air 11″ running Kuuvik Capture 2.1.1 beta. I’ll post about the whole rig I’m using for landscape shots during the coming days.

Winter’s End

Sometimes you only have a few seconds. The image below is a great example. We were driving around the forests of Zemplen to find something interesting. And suddenly part of my favorite forest were in front of us, glowing in gorgeous pink as the setting sun illuminated the trees. I stopped the car, we run to the place, but had only a few seconds to catch the last part of that pink glow. Unfortunately it’s moved out of the forest. I quickly set up the camera and snapped away – with an alternative interpretation in mind.

5D3_1309_1023

Winter’s End

I prefer to interpret this scene as a sunrise, the first spring sunrise, that brings warmth and life into the barren winter forest. The fact that this was actually a sunset doesn’t really change what the image means to me.